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New releases Vulci. Goods for Mankind. Goods for Gods
The exhibition “Vulci. Goods for mankind. Goods for gods” (20 March - 4 August 2024) hosted at the Fondazione Luigi Rovati inaugurates the cycle “Etruscan Metropolises”, a project for a series of exhibitions dedicated to some important Etruscan cities considered not only as urban and architectural realities, but also as places of historical complexity. The project stems from the Fondazione Luigi Rovati’s aim of arousing and rooting interest in the Etruscans among the public.The Etruscans are a people closely linked to the phenomenon of the city, they are the ones who invented it and the ones who spread it throughout their territory. The choice of the cities that will be presented through the “Etruscan Metropolises” cycle will be illustrative of the urban phenomenon and its historical and territorial variables but also of certain specific themes, since each exhibition will highlight the most representative and identity-related elements of each city.The first city presented is Vulci, one of the most dynamic in Etruria, the site of important manufacturing activities and a strategic junction in the Mediterranean trade routes. A city that stands out for the production of ceramics and bronze, as well as for their wide commercial distribution to Italy and in the Mediterranean.The catalogue traces the exhibition path, presenting the works in the following sections: simulacra of immortality; immigrant craftsmen, local craftsmen; the liminal landscape; from Athens to Vulci: travelling images; bronzes for war, bronzes for peace; clay devotion. The volume closes with in-depth texts on the history of the excavations conducted at Vulci and in its territory that present some unpublished findings and innovative methods of approaching archaeology. All this is enriched by the artworks of Giuseppe Penone, which express the contemporary nature of the hand gesture that becomes a vase, and from the Etruscans comes to present days. With texts by: Giuseppe Sassatelli, Mario Abis, Alessandro Conti, Sara De Angelis, Carlo Regoli, Chiara Pizzirani, Maurizio Sannibale, Laura Maria Michetti, Christian Mazet, Simona Carosi, Maurizio Forte, Carlo Casi and Giuliano Sergio.
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Vulci. Goods for Mankind. Goods for Gods

pages: 288 pages

The exhibition “Vulci. Goods for mankind. Goods for gods” (20 March - 4 August 2024) hosted at the Fondazione Luigi Rovati inaugurates the cycle “Etruscan Metropolises”, a project for a series of exhibitions dedicated to some important Etruscan cities considered not only as urban and architectural realities, but also as places of historical
New releases Giano-Culsans - Il doppio e l'ispirazione etrusca di Gino Severini. Dalle collezioni dell’Accademia Etrusca di Cortona
The exhibition "Giano-Culsans. Il doppio e l’ispirazione etrusca di Gino Severini. Dalle collezioni dell’Accademia Etrusca di Cortona" is dedicated to the theme of dualism and the double, in the two-faced, physical and symbolic relationship of dialectic and opposition. The protagonists are two Etruscan small bronzes from the 3rd century B.C., which are in turn compared with two sculptures by Gino Severini (1883-1966). The first of the two 3rd century BC Etruscan bronzes is Culsans, the Etruscan deity corresponding to the Roman Janus; the second is Selvans, god of the forest and agrarian activities.It is precisely from the Etruscan Culsans that Severini was inspired to create the two sculptures on display: the first is Giano bifronte, a bronze made in the early 1960s, while the second is a posthumous casting made at the behest of his daughter Romana Severini. Severini is an artist who has always shown interest in the Etruscan world, and more generally in the archaeology of his homeland with a strong connection to Cortona, his home town. An assiduous visitor to the Museo dell'Accademia Etrusca, he has often been inspired in his works by the finds preserved in the museum.The catalogue accompanying the exhibition, in addition to highlighting Severini's relationship with Etruscan art, delves into his bond with Pablo Picasso, another artist fascinated by the ancient world and the Etruscan one in particular, through the re-presentation of an exchange of letters dating back to 1958.
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Giano-Culsans

Il doppio e l'ispirazione etrusca di Gino Severini. Dalle collezioni dell’Accademia Etrusca di Cortona

Sergio Angori, Paolo Bruschetti, Giulio Paolucci, Romana Severini Brunori, Paolo Giulierini, Marco Belpoliti

pages: 88 pages

The exhibition "Giano-Culsans. Il doppio e l’ispirazione etrusca di Gino Severini. Dalle collezioni dell’Accademia Etrusca di Cortona" is dedicated to the theme of dualism and the double, in the two-faced, physical and symbolic relationship of dialectic and opposition. The protagonists are two Etruscan small bronzes from the 3rd century B.C., w
Caffè Paradiso - La Biennale di Venezia raccontata dalle sue direttrici e dai suoi direttori
Established in 1895, the Venice Biennale is not only the oldest international art exhibition, but also the most eagerly awaited event. A coveted destination for every artist and curator, it has always imposed itself as a mirror of the contemporary and, at the same time, its subversion. This is well known by Massimiliano Gioni who, well before he was the youngest to lead the lagoon kermesse, every two years interviewed the Biennale's directors, meeting them at Caffè Paradiso, the historic café at the entrance to its Giardini.Through recollections, anecdotes and confessions, Gioni recounts a 30-year history from the point of view of those who conquered the Biennale and experienced it first-hand. He recounts the challenges common to all - the struggle against time and a budget that is never enough - and those specific to each, such as the choice of artists or the difficulties at the time of the Covid epidemic; the inspirations drawn from his own, or others', experience; the various attempts to establish a dialogue between present, past and future; the desire to break down traditions and bring a new vision of curating as well as of the Biennale itself. But most of all, what emerges from these conversations is the unmistakable imprint that each of them has left on their edition.Like snow crystals, in their complex and ever-changing weave, in the same way each Biennale is a universe of its own to which each director has wanted to do justice, thus describing an ever-changing world.
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Caffè Paradiso

La Biennale di Venezia raccontata dalle sue direttrici e dai suoi direttori

Massimiliano Gioni

pages: 196 pages

Established in 1895, the Venice Biennale is not only the oldest international art exhibition, but also the most eagerly awaited event. A coveted destination for every artist and curator, it has always imposed itself as a mirror of the contemporary and, at the same time, its subversion. This is well known by Massimiliano Gioni who, well before he wa
Francesca Woodman
‘History is not in the image, but in our relationship with the image, in what it deposits in us,’ writes Bertrand Schefer, who first saw some of Francesca Woodman's photographs in the late 1990s and was thunderstruck by them. Those photographs, so repelling to him at first, return over the years to question him, to torment him, incessant as drops, persistent as a love obsession. He vows to write about her one day, to shed light on the enigma she embodies, to save her from oblivion. It is not her photograph he wants to talk about, it is she he wants to bring back to life, if only for a few moments.Like an insatiable archaeologist, he then re-exhumes everything that can help him reconstruct that 'missing story'; a story in which the flow of his own personal memories, triggered by the blurred and unattainable figure of Francesca, is mixed with the young photographer's biographical story: her childhood in Colorado, her strong ties with Italy, her parents, who were also artists, her first camera, her formative years at art school, her stay in Rome that brought such a singular temperament to maturity. Francesca stands out from the crowd, atypical wherever she goes. In her faded period clothes, she portrays herself from time to time as a phantasmal presence, ineffable, sensual, anachronistic, already aware that the contemporary world is not the scenario in which she will find her own dimension. If her art is the engine that moves her, it is also the poison that consumes her, the prison from which one day in 1981 she will succeed in freeing herself by opening the window of her ramshackle flat, at the age of just twenty-three, leaving behind an immense body of work.
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Francesca Woodman

Bertrand Schefer

pages: 68 pages

‘History is not in the image, but in our relationship with the image, in what it deposits in us,’ writes Bertrand Schefer, who first saw some of Francesca Woodman's photographs in the late 1990s and was thunderstruck by them. Those photographs, so repelling to him at first, return over the years to question him, to torment him, incessant as dro

L'ironia è una cosa seria

Strategie dell’arte d’avanguardia e contemporanea

Francesco Poli

pages: 244 pages

Capturing the ironic component in works of visual art seems a foregone conclusion. History abounds with artists who have used this ingredient with blatant satirical, grotesque, paradoxical or clamorously provocative intentions, sometimes to the point of trivialising its subversive role.Wanting to go deeper, however, there is a more subtle, complex
Armi improprie - Lo stato della critica d’arte in Italia
In the Futurist manifesto Antitradition, published in 1913, Apollinaire reserved 'mer...de aux critiques'. Just over a hundred years later that j'accuse has retained, intact, its scandalous force. Where is criticism today? Condemned to a slow euthanasia, it has become a residual genre: the figure of the critic has been replaced by that of the curator.And yet, at a time when works of art have become increasingly cryptic, this practice linked to the origins of modernity would play a decisive role. In order not to allow the esotericism and volatility of so many current art experiences to exclude us from pleasure. And to create a feeling of proximity to creations that are not infrequently repulsive. But, in order to still make sense, criticism can only go back to its original reasons. To remodel, through words, the painted signs. Reaffirm the centrality of the work. Telling how a painting came into being and what it represents; what its author's objectives were; how he formed himself; what techniques he used; what relations he had with the society in which he acted; what symbols he referred to. And again: teaching one to see better what is in evidence, but also what hides in the shadows. Finally, not to let oneself be seduced by the myth of the eternal beginning, to give oneself as a restless history of the present. And, at the same time, as a 'partial, passionate, political' exercise (in Baudelaire's words). Critics such as Roberto Longhi and Lionello Venturi, Giulio Carlo Argan and Francesco Arcangeli, Cesare Brandi and Filiberto Menna, Giuliano Briganti and Emilio Villa, Germano Celant and Achille Bonito Oliva, Carla Lonzi and Lea Vergine, among others, have interpreted this philosophy with different and distant sensitivities and cultures. To the topicality of their lecture is dedicated Armi improprie. Which suggests an exciting journey through ideas, theories, books, articles, projects, exhibitions, corsair experiences. Thus drawing the outlines of a possible canon of 20th century Italian art criticism.
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Armi improprie

Lo stato della critica d’arte in Italia

pages: 384 pages

In the Futurist manifesto Antitradition, published in 1913, Apollinaire reserved 'mer...de aux critiques'. Just over a hundred years later that j'accuse has retained, intact, its scandalous force. Where is criticism today? Condemned to a slow euthanasia, it has become a residual genre: the figure of the critic has been replaced by that of the curat
The Stele of Kaminia, the Etruscans and the island of Lemnos
The Stele of Kaminia, preserved at the National Archaeological Museum in Athens, is one of the three most illustrious inscriptions of antiquity that have guided generations of Italians to the Hellas in search of the past.Created in the 6th century B.C. as a tomb marker, and recovered between 1883 and 1885 on the island of Lemno, it was originally a couple of metres high but today only the upper half remains, with the profile of a man holding a spear and shield, who had distinguished himself in society for his virtues as a fighter. Around the figure and on the right side of the stone, two hundred letters of the Greek alphabet were engraved: a total of thirty-three words on eleven lines written in alternating directions, from top to bottom and then from bottom to top, or from right to left and then vice versa. But the language written in Greek is neither Greek nor Indo-European and belongs to the same family as Etruscan and Rhaetic, which was spoken and written in an area on the borders of Austria, Switzerland and Germany.Archaeologists, historians and linguists dealing with the Kaminia stele and its context are grappling with an unresolved question. Indeed, the question is whether the inhabitants of Lemno, as witnessed by the stele and other inscriptions, are of the same lineage as the Etruscans who migrated from Anatolia, with one group settled in Lemno and another arriving in Etruria, or whether they were Etruscans who came to Lemno from Italy to establish a colony or trading station and pirates in the Aegean. It is not easy to know what happened. The community that wrote on stone and terracotta in the Lemnian language is indistinguishable from other possible social and ethnic groups on the island, with whom they may have shared the same material and figurative culture, technologies, religious and funerary rites, and ways of life. If the Tyrrhenians of Lemno came from Etruria, they did not maintain contact with the motherland, according to the complete absence of objects manufactured in Italy. For the hypothesis of migration from Anatolia, we are completely unaware of the place of origin, culture and traditions. «No one has seen the truth, there is only opinion» (Simonide di Ceo).The history of the stele, and of the people of which it was an expression, is narrated in this book, which presents four texts signed by Carlo De Domenico, Riccardo Di Cesare, Germano Sarcone and Emanuele Papi, director of the Italian Archaeological School of Athens, in addition to the introduction by Emanuele Papi.
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The Stele of Kaminia, the Etruscans and the island of Lemnos

Emanuele Papi, Carlo De Domenico, Riccardo Di Cesare, Germano Sarcone

pages: 120 pages

The Stele of Kaminia, preserved at the National Archaeological Museum in Athens, is one of the three most illustrious inscriptions of antiquity that have guided generations of Italians to the Hellas in search of the past.Created in the 6th century B.C. as a tomb marker, and recovered between 1883 and 1885 on the island of Lemno, it was originally a

Il sublime astratto

Pietro Conte

pages: 120 pages

Misunderstanding is part and parcel of human relationships, and when those communicating are Erwin Panofsky, the foremost theorist of medieval and Renaissance iconology, and Barnett Newman, exponent and leading theorist of Abstract Expressionism, disaster is assured. Especially if no one is willing to come to terms.A controversy around the term 'su

Storia culturale degli Etruschi

Sybille Haynes

pages: 520

That of the Etruscans is a culture that has long remained mysterious and has never ceased to gain the attention of scholars of all eras. Open to the decisive Greek and oriental influences, but also projected towards the neighboring populations of central and northern Italy, it managed to make its echo reach beyond the Alps.Of this people, Sybille H

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