Libri di Marco Meneguzzo - libri Johan & Levi Editore

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Marco Meneguzzo

author
Johan & Levi
Art critic, independent curator and professor at the Brera Academy of Fine Arts in Milan, where he teaches History of Contemporary Art and Museology and Management of Exhibition Systems. Over the course of the last fifteen years, he has travelled various times to China, India and Russia to study the situation of artists, taste and art systems in emerging countries, while still pursuing his study of the driving forces in the history of Western art.

Author's books

Lack of culture, financial resources and globalization are rapidly driving the languages of art into a cul-de-sac. The definitive decline of the avant-garde movements and the erosion of the intellectual power that had supported them, along with the image of art as a status symbol, have fostered the rise of a type of art collecting, which devoid of sufficient knowledge of the object of its desire, has nonetheless imposed new rules of the game and provoked a radical standardization of taste. At one time, collecting – that tangible fruit of developed taste, its material visualization – was the prerogative of a cultured, charismatic aristocracy, capable of bringing legitimacy and authority to the battle of ideas; today, on the contrary, it is mostly seeking consensus while treating art objects like mass-produced souvenirs that should be as recognizable as an image of the Eiffel Tower, familiar even to those who have never been to Paris. Guided by conformity and armed with massive sums of capital, collectors choose trophy-works with the sole aim of confirming their membership not in an elite of knowledgeable art lovers but in the club of the wealthy. For their part, artists offer no resistance to this standardizing arrangement, having lost the antagonistic role that once sheltered them from the whims of fashion. They are now forced to chase after economic success and produce “obedient” art, respectful of the dictates of marketing and globalized taste, at the expense of the autonomy that had been their most prized and powerful quality until only a few decades ago. This lively essay, scathingly controversial even in its title, analyzes changes in the spirit of the times, in taste in collecting, in the system by which art is disseminated and ultimately in art itself, reflecting the changes over the last thirty-five years in society, geo-politics and the economy.  
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Il capitale ignorante

Ovvero come l'ignoranza sta cambiando l'arte

Marco Meneguzzo

pages: 135 pages

Lack of culture, financial resources and globalization are rapidly driving the languages of art into a cul-de-sac. The definitive decline of the avant-garde movements and the erosion of the intellectual power that had supported them, along with the image of art as a status symbol, have fostered the rise of a type of art collecting, which devoid of

Programmare l’arte

Olivetti e le neoavanguardie cinetiche

Marco Meneguzzo, Enrico Morteo, Alberto Saibene

pages: 184 pages

The exhibition of “Programmed Art” was inaugurated in the Olivetti Store in the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele, Milan, on 15 May 1962. The name Arte Programmata was coined by Bruno Munari, who launched the initiative, and Umberto Eco, the theorist of kinetic art as a paradigm of the “open work”, was responsible for the catalogue. The young and
A cinquant’anni dalla prima mostra di Arte Programmata (Milano, 1962), l’autore propone una riflessione su ciò che resta di un esperimento di neoavanguardia che ha tentato di coniugare  teoria della percezione e produzione industriale. Voluta da Bruno Munari, presentata da Umberto Eco, sponsorizzata dalla Olivetti, l’Arte Programmata non è solo un movimento italiano riconducibile al più vasto mondo dell’arte cinetica, ma un vero e proprio tentativo di definizione del campo dell’arte, ai tempi della società industriale e cittadina, che muove dal nuovissimo concetto – per allora – di “programmazione”, attorno a cui ruotava tutto il dibattito interno agli intellettuali vicini alla Olivetti, che proprio in quegli anni era all’avanguardia nel campo dei piccoli processori elettronici. Superato un lungo periodo di oblio e di silenzio, oggi l’Arte Programmata gode di nuovo favore, e di un rinnovato interesse critico, storico e di mercato: perché sta avvenendo ciò? Cosa rende ancora attuale quel movimento? Quale movimento di nostalgia e di “revival” riesce a innescare tutt’oggi? Un’agile riflessione che passa senza soluzione di continuità dagli anni Sessanta ad oggi che cerca di dare una risposta alle ragioni di questo successo, e contemporaneamente indaga sulle possibilità di un’utopia legata al concetto di “arte industriale”, mentre riflette su quella definizione di “arte”, il vero motivo che è riuscito a trascendere il mezzo secolo che ci separa dalla sua prima uscita.
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Arte Programmata cinquant’anni dopo

Marco Meneguzzo

pages: 76 pages

A cinquant’anni dalla prima mostra di Arte Programmata (Milano, 1962), l’autore propone una riflessione su ciò che resta di un esperimento di neoavanguardia che ha tentato di coniugare  teoria della percezione e produzione industriale. Voluta da Bruno Munari, presentata da Umberto Eco, sponsorizzata dalla Olivetti, l’Arte Programmata non è
For at least a decade now, the Western art system has found itself faced in the international arena with new players who appear to want to play according to rules of their own making. The first inklings of change came in the 1980s, when art became a financial opportunity of global potential. Thanks to the use of more accessible languages, postmodern art appealed to increasingly vast audiences, prospering as it expanded onto new terrain: the soaring art market paved the way for the artwork becoming a status symbol, and a broadening of horizons to include countries like China, Russia and India, in search of recognition on the Western stage. The euphoria of that period, however, was soon dampened by the current climate of uncertainty, caused by the break-up of the old system and the declassing of its constituent parts – the intellectual component (the critics, who lent legitimacy to artistic practices) and the institutional component (the museums, which conserved the works for posterity). The current measure of success is the speculative spirit – in all senses – of the new players, who, with the ease of those used to wielding hefty amounts of capital, lay down the law in the closed circuit of gallery-collector-auction house-museum. Even artists, previously the system’s driving force, risk being reduced to the status of mere cogs in the machine. Well aware of the setting they operate in, they have acquiesced to the impoverishment brought about by globalisation: while in the past they sought to innovate, now they stick firmly to linguistic standards that are instantly recognisable in all corners of the globe. In this short work of global scope, which surveys the past in order to have insight into the complex transformations under way in the present, Marco Meneguzzo identifies the dividing line between before and after, namely between art as exclusive and elite and art as popular, globalised phenomenon, envisaging a future that wavers between a soft process of change in the art system and the conception of art itself, and a more apocalyptic scenario.
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Breve storia della globalizzazione in arte

(e delle sue conseguenze)

Marco Meneguzzo

pages: 176 pages

For at least a decade now, the Western art system has found itself faced in the international arena with new players who appear to want to play according to rules of their own making. The first inklings of change came in the 1980s, when art became a financial opportunity of global potential. Thanks to the use of more accessible languages, postmoder
 

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